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Best books of 2018: Young Adult

The year’s best young adult books aren’t just for teen readers. Read on for our favorite immersive historicals, sweeping fantasies, stories that tackle some of today’s most headline-grabbing social issues and more. An Assassin’s Guide to Love and Treason by Virginia Boecker The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi The Cruel Prince by Holly Black Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram Dread Nation by Justina Ireland Girl Made of Stars by Ashley Herring Blake A Heart in a Body in the…
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Best Books of 2018: Romance

Best Books of 2018: Romance

Once again, the gods of time have conspired to make me, your humble romance editor, do something that causes me no end of distress—present the top 10 romances of the year. I will be rereading all of my selections in order to recover from such a strenuous process. But seriously, the difficulty of narrowing down all the fantastic books released this year was a wonderful problem to have. Unsurprisingly, the list that emerged is a tribute to the genre, and especially its ability to both tell a fantastic, transportive love story and address real-life issues. If anyone still dares to…
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Digital Dalliances: Best of Luck

Digital Dalliances: Best of Luck

Posted by Savanna, Associate Editor on December 05, 2018 Every month, we review the hottest new romance releases in our Romance column. But why let the print books have all the fun? In Digital Dalliances, we highlight digital-only releases guaranteed to heat up your eReader. Best of Luck by Kate ClaybornLyrical Shine • $3.99 • ISBN 9781516105144Publication date: November 27, 2018 order from: B & N | Amazon | BAM I am very late to the Kate Clayborn party, which I blame on both my only covering one digital romance a month (I’m only one person, everyone) and my preference for really out-there genres…
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Best Books of 2018: Readers’ Choice

Best Books of 2018: Readers’ Choice

BookPage readers voted, and the results are in! These are your 10 favorite books of the year. (Unsurprisingly, our readers have really good taste.) #1 EducatedBy Tara Westover #2 The Great AloneBy Kristin Hannah #3 Where the Crawdads SingBy Delia Owens #4 CirceBy Madeline Miller #5 There ThereBy Tommy Orange #6 An American MarriageBy Tayari Jones #7 The Woman in the WindowBy A.J. Finn #8 The ImmortalistsBy Chloe Benjamin #9 Lethal WhiteBy Robert Galbraith #10 UnshelteredBy Barbara Kingsolver
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I ALONE CAN FIX IT

I ALONE CAN FIX IT

by Willie Nelson with Turk Pipkin ‧ RELEASE DATE: June 29, 2021 An epistolary grab bag of memories, lyrics, jokes, and homespun philosophy from the legendary musician. As an indefatigable touring artist, Nelson (b. 1933) has had a lot of time on his hands during the pandemic. Following his collaboration with his sister, Me and Sister Bobbie, the road warrior offers a loose collection of lessons from a full life. If you’ve never read a book by or about Nelson, this one—characteristically conversational, inspirational, wise, funny, and meandering—is a good place to start. The book is filled with lyrics to…
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The best romance covers of 2018

The best romance covers of 2018

Posted by Savanna, Associate Editor on December 13, 2018 This is always one of my favorite posts to put together—who wouldn’t want to gaze at shirtless men and glorious gowns? But this year’s list was particularly fun in that the noble art of the romance cover has been going through a much-noticed evolution, which is one that this reader much prefers to the plague of Fifty Shades-esque jackets from a few years back. If I never see a supposedly sexy inanimate object on a black background again, I’ll die happy. But the covers below? They can stay. Indecent ExposureCover design…
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What they’re reading: Gretchen Anthony

What they’re reading: Gretchen Anthony

Posted by Lily, Associate Editor on December 10, 2018 One thing I find very helpful to remember during the holidays is that every family is dysfunctional. That fact is on full display in Gretchen Anthony’s clever, delightful novel set over a family holiday, Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, in which one daughter’s secret threatens to ruin the family’s picture-perfect plans. (Read the review.) Anthony is a Minnesota-based writer, and Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners is her first novel. Here, she tells us about what she’s been reading. Fin & Lady by Cathleen Schine I love books about atypical families trying to…
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Exclusive cover reveal: ‘Midsummer’s Mayhem’

Exclusive cover reveal: ‘Midsummer’s Mayhem’

Posted by Hilli, Assistant Editor on December 05, 2018 BookPage is thrilled to reveal the cover for Rajani LaRocca’s debut middle grade novel, Midsummer’s Mayhem, which will be published by Yellow Jacket on June 4, 2019! LaRocca has described her enchanting story as “an Indian-American middle grade mashup of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and competitive baking shows in which 11-year-old Mimi dreams of winning a celebrity chef-judged baking contest, meets a mysterious boy in the woods, and stirs up all sorts of trouble with her baking.” Sounds like my kind of story! Add this one to your TBR list, and…
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FANGS FOR HAVING US!

FANGS FOR HAVING US!

by John Hare ; illustrated by John Hare ‧ RELEASE DATE: May 14, 2019 Left behind when the space bus departs, a child discovers that the moon isn’t as lifeless as it looks. While the rest of the space-suited class follows the teacher like ducklings, one laggard carrying crayons and a sketchbook sits down to draw our home planet floating overhead, falls asleep, and wakes to see the bus zooming off. The bright yellow bus, the gaggle of playful field-trippers, and even the dull gray boulders strewn over the equally dull gray lunar surface have a rounded solidity suggestive of…
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HALF SICK OF SHADOWS

HALF SICK OF SHADOWS

by Max Brooks ‧ RELEASE DATE: June 16, 2020 Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006). A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for Brooks’ latest puts it, when Mount Rainier popped its cork, “it was the psychological aspect, the hyperbole-fueled hysteria that had ended up killing the most people.” Maybe, but the sasquatches whom the volcano displaced contributed to the statistics, too, if only out of self-defense. Brooks…
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