MURDER AT TEAL’S POND

My Book Recommendation

9781542026437

“There’s got to be something wrong with somebody who’d do a thing like that.” This is Perry Edward Smith, talking about himself. “Deal me out, baby…I’m a normal.” This is Richard Eugene Hickock, talking about himself. They’re as sick a pair as Leopold and Loeb and together they killed a mother, a father, a pretty 17-year-old and her brother, none of whom they’d seen before, in cold blood. A couple of days before they had bought a 100 foot rope to garrote them—enough for ten people if necessary. This small pogrom took place in Holcomb, Kansas, a lonesome town on a flat, limitless landscape: a depot, a store, a cafe, two filling stations, 270 inhabitants. The natives refer to it as “out there.” It occurred in 1959 and Capote has spent five years, almost all of the time which has since elapsed, in following up this crime which made no sense, had no motive, left few clues—just a footprint and a remembered conversation. Capote’s alternating dossier Shifts from the victims, the Clutter family, to the boy who had loved Nancy Clutter, and her best friend, to the neighbors, and to the recently paroled perpetrators: Perry, with a stunted child’s legs and a changeling’s face, and Dick, who had one squinting eye but a “smile that works.” They had been cellmates at the Kansas State Penitentiary where another prisoner had told them about the Clutters—he’d hired out once on Mr. Clutter’s farm and thought that Mr. Clutter was perhaps rich. And this is the lead which finally broke the case after Perry and Dick had drifted down to Mexico, back to the midwest, been seen in Kansas City, and were finally picked up in Las Vegas. The last, even more terrible chapters, deal with their confessions, the law man who wanted to see them hanged, back to back, the trial begun in 1960, the post-ponements of the execution, and finally the walk to “The Corner” and Perry’s soft-spoken words—”It would be meaningless to apologize for what I did. Even inappropriate. But I do. I apologize.” It’s a magnificent job—this American tragedy—with the incomparable Capote touches throughout. There may never have been a perfect crime, but if there ever has been a perfect reconstruction of one, surely this must be it.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 1965

ISBN: 0375507906

Page Count: 343

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Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 10, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1965

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